President says DACA fight over illegal immigrants will continue

Says Supreme Court 'punted' on the issue.

Posted: Jun 19, 2020 9:30 AM
Updated: Jun 19, 2020 9:35 AM

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump said Friday that he will renew his administration's effort to end legal protections for young immigrants after the Supreme Court blocked the first try.

In a tweet Friday morning, Trump said, “The Supreme Court asked us to resubmit on DACA, nothing was lost or won. They “punted” much like in a football game (where hopefully they would stand for our great American Flag). We will be submitting enhanced papers shortly.”

The high court on Thursday ruled that Trump improperly ended the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program in 2017. Chief Justice John Roberts joined the four liberal justices in the 5-4 majority, while the conservative justices called DACA illegal.

Trump could still take away the ability for hundreds of thousands of them to live and work legally in the United States. With no legislative answer in sight, that means the uncertainty of the last eight years isn't over for many who know of nowhere else as home.

Activists are vowing to keep fighting for a long-term solution for 650,000 immigrants who were brought to the country as children. They face a White House that's prioritized immigration restrictions and a divided Congress that's unlikely to pass legislation giving them a path to citizenship anytime soon.

Ken Cuccinelli, acting head of U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, said Friday that the administration was starting over. “We’re going to move as quickly as we can to put options in front of the president," but those are executive branch options, he told “Fox & Friends.”

“That still leaves open the appropriate solution which the Supreme Court mentioned and that is that Congress step up to the plate,” he said.

Cuccinelli said Sen. Dick Durbin, D-Ill., made some positive comments in that direction on on Thursday so the administration thinks it's possible for a constructive conversation with Congress.

Trump slammed the court ruling, tweeting: “These horrible & politically charged decisions coming out of the Supreme Court are shotgun blasts into the face of people that are proud to call themselves Republicans or Conservatives," apparently also referring to a ruling this week that said it’s illegal to fire people because they’re gay or transgender.

But experts say there isn't enough time to knock down the 8-year-old program before the November election and doubt the government would try because DACA is popular with voters.

The court decision elicited surprise, joy and then apprehension from immigrants and advocates who know it's only a temporary solution.

“This is a huge victory for us,” Diana Rodriguez, a 22-year-old DACA recipient, said through tears.

Rodriguez, who works with the New York Immigration Coalition, said she hasn’t been to Mexico since she was brought to the U.S. at age 2. The ruling means young immigrants can keep working, providing for their families and making “a difference in this country," she said.

But the work isn’t over, Rodriguez said: “We can’t stop right now, we have to continue fighting.”

Congressional Democrats, meanwhile, appeared satisfied to let the court’s decision stand as the law of the land for now.

While Republicans protested that now, if ever, was the time for Congress to clarify the immigration system, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi made it clear that Democrats were done with their legislation before the summer break and had little interest in meeting GOP demands to fund Trump’s long-promised border wall as part of any comprehensive immigration overhaul.

“There isn’t anybody in the immigration community that wants us to trade a wall for immigration,” she said.

Pelosi was reminded that Trump has said he wants immigration reform. “We’ll see,” she said, noting how few days remain on the legislative calendar. “I don’t know what the president meant — maybe he doesn’t either.”

Democratic presidential contender Joe Biden said that if elected, he would send lawmakers proposed legislation on his first day in office to make DACA protections permanent.

The program grew out of an impasse over a comprehensive immigration bill between Congress and the Obama administration in 2012. Under intense pressure from young activists, President Barack Obama decided to formally protect people from deportation and allow them to work legally in the U.S.

Immigrants who are part of DACA will keep those protections, but there are tens of thousands of others who could have enrolled if Trump didn't halt the program three years ago.

The Migration Policy Institute, a nonpartisan think tank, estimates that about 66,000 young immigrants meet the age requirement to join the program — 15 — but haven't been able to do so because the government has only been renewing two-year permits for those already enrolled.

The Coalition for Humane Immigrant Rights has filed a DACA application for a person who's not part of the program already, legal services director Luis Perez said, though U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services hasn't signaled whether it will accept any.

“The circuit courts have already told USCIS you must accept renewals. Now that there’s been a Supreme Court decision, really the instructions are gonna be you need to bring back the program in full effect,” Perez said.

It's unlikely the Trump administration will take new applications without being forced by the courts.

USCIS deputy director for policy Joseph Edlow said in a statement that the court’s opinion “has no basis in law and merely delays the president’s lawful ability to end the illegal Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals amnesty program.”

A spokesperson said the agency was reviewing the decision and had no further comment.

And so the ups and downs continue, many coming from Trump himself. During the 2016 campaign, he vowed to repeal DACA. After his election, he softened his stance, saying at one point that DACA recipients had nothing to worry about. But under pressure from hard-liners, he announced in 2017 that he was ending the program.

Reyna Montoya, a DACA recipient from the Phoenix area who leads an immigrant rights advocacy organization, said she and others will keep pushing Congress to take up legislation addressing young immigrants.

“At this moment, the Senate needs to act, needs to come up with a proposal that will give us a path to citizenship,” Montoya said.

Minnesota Coronavirus Cases

Data is updated nightly.

Cases: 603876

Reported Deaths: 7610
CountyCasesDeaths
Hennepin1247791772
Ramsey52449895
Dakota46780470
Anoka42709458
Washington27396290
Stearns22549224
St. Louis18123312
Scott17540134
Wright16404148
Olmsted13387102
Sherburne1200094
Carver1065948
Clay825492
Rice8186110
Blue Earth762343
Crow Wing681494
Kandiyohi667285
Chisago619252
Otter Tail585684
Benton582898
Goodhue483373
Douglas475381
Mower470733
Winona461151
Itasca458963
Isanti439664
McLeod429761
Morrison424462
Nobles407950
Beltrami407160
Steele397416
Polk389072
Becker386555
Lyon363853
Carlton352656
Freeborn346932
Pine335023
Nicollet330945
Mille Lacs311454
Brown307840
Le Sueur297125
Cass285632
Todd285632
Meeker263042
Waseca237823
Martin234932
Roseau210821
Wabasha20783
Hubbard196041
Dodge18773
Renville182446
Redwood176338
Houston174016
Cottonwood167124
Wadena162723
Fillmore157410
Faribault154319
Chippewa153938
Pennington153820
Kanabec146828
Sibley146810
Aitkin138637
Watonwan13589
Rock128719
Jackson122612
Pipestone116626
Yellow Medicine114920
Pope11296
Murray107010
Swift106918
Koochiching94917
Stevens92411
Clearwater89116
Marshall88717
Wilkin83112
Lake83020
Lac qui Parle75622
Big Stone6044
Grant5938
Lincoln5843
Mahnomen5669
Norman5479
Kittson49022
Unassigned48093
Red Lake4017
Traverse3755
Lake of the Woods3453
Cook1720

Iowa Coronavirus Cases

Data is updated nightly.

Cases: 370654

Reported Deaths: 6041
CountyCasesDeaths
Polk58194638
Linn21186339
Scott20290246
Black Hawk16075312
Woodbury15231230
Johnson1461085
Dubuque13501211
Dallas1128599
Pottawattamie11218173
Story1070848
Warren583691
Clinton561493
Cerro Gordo553293
Sioux516974
Webster515194
Muscatine4876106
Marshall486476
Des Moines466970
Wapello4333122
Buena Vista426140
Jasper420972
Plymouth402881
Lee381956
Marion365976
Jones300857
Henry294137
Bremer287760
Carroll286852
Boone268334
Crawford267740
Benton259255
Washington256651
Dickinson249444
Mahaska232351
Jackson225242
Clay216527
Kossuth216166
Tama211771
Delaware210943
Winneshiek197935
Page194522
Buchanan193233
Cedar192123
Hardin187344
Fayette186443
Wright185940
Hamilton181851
Harrison179973
Clayton171057
Butler166035
Madison164419
Mills163324
Floyd163042
Cherokee159438
Lyon158841
Poweshiek156936
Allamakee152652
Hancock150134
Iowa149824
Winnebago144331
Cass139155
Calhoun138913
Grundy137133
Emmet135841
Jefferson133535
Shelby131437
Sac130820
Union129935
Louisa129749
Appanoose129049
Mitchell126643
Chickasaw124517
Franklin123323
Guthrie123032
Humboldt119526
Palo Alto113623
Howard104922
Montgomery103638
Clarke100924
Keokuk96432
Monroe96230
Unassigned9540
Ida91535
Adair87332
Pocahontas85822
Davis85225
Monona82931
Osceola79016
Greene78011
Lucas77923
Worth7598
Taylor66712
Fremont6269
Decatur6159
Ringgold56324
Van Buren56318
Wayne54423
Audubon52910
Adams3444
Rochester
Clear
64° wxIcon
Hi: 81° Lo: 60°
Feels Like: 64°
Mason City
Clear
62° wxIcon
Hi: 86° Lo: 57°
Feels Like: 62°
Albert Lea
Partly Cloudy
63° wxIcon
Hi: 83° Lo: 56°
Feels Like: 63°
Austin
Partly Cloudy
61° wxIcon
Hi: 82° Lo: 55°
Feels Like: 61°
Charles City
Partly Cloudy
63° wxIcon
Hi: 85° Lo: 56°
Feels Like: 63°
Tracking storm chances later this week
KIMT Radar
KIMT Eye in the sky

Latest Video

Image

Superintendent Muñoz says goodbye to RPS, shares update on boundary exceptions

Image

RPS Superintendent Muñoz says goodbye to RPS

Image

RPS updates plans for boundary changes

Image

Dangers with Drought

Image

Minnesota Emergency Declaration

Image

MAYO Heritage Hall Reopens

Image

Gates of Rochester Shooting

Image

Rochester selected as a finalist in the 2021 Global Mayors Challenge

Image

How to deal with Pondweed

Image

Motorcycle Awareness

Community Events