STREAMING NOW: Watch Now

Program teaches lifesaving trauma techniques

A campaign called Stop the Bleed offers lectures and hands-on training for students learning lifesaving trauma techniques to help keep an emergency situation stable until first responders can arrive.

Posted: Aug 21, 2018 1:53 PM
Updated: Aug 21, 2018 1:57 PM

It's a nightmare scenario that's increasingly being viewed as a possibility, especially for students across the United States: emergency medical treatment for massive trauma.

"Let's say you've found someone who's bleeding. You've assessed the situation. You've decided that it's safe for you to enter. You've called for help or assigned somebody to do that. What do you do?" Dr. Habeeba Park, assistant professor of surgery at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, asks while training high school students in skills that she hopes they never have to use. "You're trying to save this person's life."

Park's lessons are part of a campaign called Stop the Bleed, which holds special significance in a year marked by campus violence. In 2018 alone, more than 30 people have been killed in school shootings across the country, including 17 in February at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida.

Dr. Thomas Scalea, physician-in-chief at the R Adams Cowley Shock Trauma Center in Baltimore, said that when he was in school, "I didn't worry about whether I was going to be shot, and I didn't worry about whether there was going to be a mass casualty at my school or my city. It's a different world."

Through lectures and hands-on training, instructors teach how to apply tourniquets, pack wounds and keep the situation stable until first responders can arrive. These are techniques that were once reserved solely for members of the military, said Scalea, who is not involved in the campaign.

"You hear these things on the news, and you're like, that's sad, but when it's close to you or happening to you, it's a different thing altogether," said Angel Onons, a high school junior student in the Houston area, not far from where 10 people were killed at Santa Fe High School in May.

She got Stop the Bleed certified, which involved participating in a few hours of lectures and demonstrating the skills involved, just ahead of the 2018-19 school year.

"All the things we probably didn't take seriously, because of what happened [at Santa Fe High], we started to take it seriously," Onons said. "Even the drills that we had, it became more intense, and people's emotions were put into everything they were doing."

Stop the Bleed began after the 2012 Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting, in which 20 children and six adults were killed.

"If we go back to Sandy Hook, about a third of those children could have been saved, had we had this operational," Scalea said. "The paramedics aren't going to get there right away."

The campaign -- an initiative of the American College of Surgeons and the Hartford Consensus, a set of recommendations on active shooter and other mass casualty events by one of the association's committees -- aims to provide training and credible information on bleeding control.

Instructors are trained through the program. Anyone can sign up to take classes, which are popular with schools and workplaces.

In a mass-casualty scenario, every second can make a difference.

According to the American College of Surgeons, people with especially severe injuries can bleed to death within five minutes. "This is a disease of time. The clock starts ticking when you get hurt, not when you get to the hospital," Scalea said.

Yassmin Falahat, a Houston-area high school student, is also getting her certification ahead of the new school year. "Kids my age don't really want to think about all the possibilities that can happen," she said. "When you're doing these [lifesaving] things, they could be screaming or yelling and telling you to stop, and you just have to continue."

For 17-year-old Maddison Stueckler, it was the deadly shooting at the Capital Gazette newspaper in Annapolis, Maryland, in June that was on her mind as she too got Stop the Bleed certified. The shooting happened only minutes from where she goes to school.

"Along with the CPR that we learn in health class high school, this should be something that we learn, because it's happening everywhere," Stueckler said. "It happened 20 miles from where I live, and it's happening all over the place."

Scalea agreed: "I never thought we were going to need to do this. But we do. And this is arming the public with power. It's a powerful tool, the ability to save a life."

Minnesota Coronavirus Cases

Data is updated nightly.

Confirmed Cases: 20573

Reported Deaths: 878
CountyConfirmedDeaths
Hennepin6918534
Ramsey231697
Stearns192312
Nobles14572
Anoka116455
Dakota105935
Olmsted55110
Washington50626
Kandiyohi4541
Clay36623
Rice3652
Scott3462
Wright2401
Sherburne2081
Todd1970
Benton1662
Carver1612
Mower1501
Steele1400
Martin1245
Blue Earth1121
St. Louis11113
Pine850
Freeborn840
Winona7715
Carlton730
Nicollet683
Cottonwood620
Polk582
Otter Tail550
Itasca527
Goodhue522
Watonwan500
Chisago481
Dodge430
Meeker420
Crow Wing421
Le Sueur411
Chippewa400
Jackson390
Morrison380
Murray350
Becker320
Lyon310
Douglas290
McLeod260
Isanti250
Waseca240
Rock210
Unassigned199
Fillmore171
Mille Lacs161
Wabasha160
Swift150
Sibley120
Beltrami120
Wilkin113
Norman110
Kanabec111
Cass113
Faribault110
Brown112
Pipestone100
Marshall80
Pennington70
Pope70
Aitkin60
Wadena60
Yellow Medicine50
Koochiching50
Lincoln50
Mahnomen51
Renville50
Lac qui Parle30
Red Lake30
Big Stone30
Redwood30
Traverse30
Grant20
Houston20
Clearwater20
Hubbard10
Kittson10
Lake10
Roseau10

Iowa Coronavirus Cases

Data is updated nightly.

Confirmed Cases: 17227

Reported Deaths: 456
CountyConfirmedDeaths
Polk3714108
Woodbury255524
Black Hawk167639
Linn92775
Marshall86611
Dallas84914
Johnson5987
Muscatine54339
Wapello5004
Crawford4772
Tama39023
Louisa3347
Scott3319
Dubuque31916
Jasper25616
Buena Vista2310
Pottawattamie2106
Sioux1990
Washington1798
Allamakee1184
Wright1170
Plymouth1080
Warren1060
Story941
Poweshiek888
Bremer676
Henry611
Clinton601
Boone540
Des Moines531
Mahaska526
Cedar451
Guthrie433
Taylor370
Benton371
Jones360
Monroe334
Iowa320
Clarke320
Osceola320
Shelby310
Buchanan310
Clayton303
Marion290
Webster271
Fayette260
Hamilton260
Madison241
Monona230
Cerro Gordo221
Lee220
Winneshiek210
Davis200
Lyon190
Grundy190
Harrison190
Floyd181
Jefferson150
Cherokee150
Butler150
Mills140
Delaware140
Humboldt130
Sac130
Greene130
Keokuk130
Hardin130
Howard120
Hancock120
Appanoose123
Audubon111
Jackson110
Cass110
Ida100
Page100
Clay100
Winnebago100
Carroll90
Van Buren80
Franklin80
Dickinson80
Adair80
Chickasaw80
Kossuth70
Emmet70
Lucas60
Montgomery60
Union60
Adams50
Ringgold40
Fremont40
Pocahontas40
Mitchell40
Palo Alto30
Worth30
Unassigned30
Calhoun20
Wayne10
Decatur00
Rochester
Scattered Clouds
76° wxIcon
Hi: 78° Lo: 65°
Feels Like: 76°
Mason City
Few Clouds
75° wxIcon
Hi: 78° Lo: 65°
Feels Like: 75°
Albert Lea
Scattered Clouds
75° wxIcon
Hi: 75° Lo: 65°
Feels Like: 75°
Austin
Scattered Clouds
79° wxIcon
Hi: 79° Lo: 67°
Feels Like: 81°
Charles City
Broken Clouds
79° wxIcon
Hi: 79° Lo: 65°
Feels Like: 81°
Storms a brewin'
KIMT Radar
KIMT Eye in the sky

Latest Video

Image

Memorial Day Dinner

Image

Salvation Army Dental Care Needs PPE

Image

Sara's Midday Forecast - Monday

Image

Ironwood Springs offering alternatives for camps

Image

Pregnancy support during the Pandemic

Image

Sara's Daybreak Forecast - Monday

${item.thumbnail.title}

StormTeam 3: Memorial Day's severe weather threat

Image

Deciding on the return of prep sports in Iowa

Image

Sean Weather 5/24

Image

Minnesota campgrounds missing out on Memorial Day Weekend

Community Events